Archive for November, 2011

THE HOBBIT checks in with latest report

THE HOBBIT, Production Video #4

James Cameron Looking at Edius 3D Toolset

Broadcast equipment manufacturer Grass Valley has introduced a new 3D toolset for its Edius multiformat nonlinear editing software.

“We see 3D production and post projects increasing around the world,” said Charlie Dunn, executive vp products at Grass Valley. “Now anyone working on an Edius system can instantly add 3D post capability to their arsenal of production tools and generate new revenue by expanding their client base.”

In September, James Cameron and Vince Pace’s Cameron | Pace Group and Grass Valley entered into a strategic alliance aimed at expanding the use of 3D in the broadcast industry through technology development.

As part of the alliance, CPG is currently reviewing the Edius 3D toolset with an eye toward incorporating it into a live 3D workflow, according to the manufacturer.

In December, a 30-day preview of the 3D version of Edius will be available online for testing purposes.

source: hollywoodreporter.com

Ladies and Gentlemen, introducing Avid Media Composer 6.0

Full 64-bit power Full 64-bit power

Fast gets even faster with native 64-bit operation, so even when you layer together the most complex effects, things will still feel snappy. Experience smoother playback, faster rendering performance, and better handling with large bins—and say goodbye to the old memory limitations of the 32-bit operating systems.

Experience the "waitless" workflow Experience the “waitless” workflow

With AMA (Avid Media Access), you can instantly access and edit file-based media—including new RED/RED EPIC, new AVCHD, ProRes, QuickTime (including footage from HDSLR cameras), XDCAM, P2, Canon XF, and other formats—without transcoding, importing, or rewrapping files (watch the video). Get a jumpstart on reviewing footage without the wait, and avoid bringing in unwanted material. And as new cameras and formats emerge, manufacturers can create and release their own AMA plug-ins independently from a Media Composer release.

Work with any media Work with any media

File-based media, analog and digital tape, stereoscopic 3D material, film — bring it on. Media Composer offers a wide range of features, workflows, and options that enable you to work with everything, from old-school media to the latest camera technologies. Experience the fastest tapeless workflows in the industry. Capture footage directly from digital cameras. Or add an Avid or third-party video interface to capture from other analog or digital sources. Plus, with support for 4:4:4 HD-RGB color and DNxHD 444, you can work efficiently while preserving the full-quality color detail from beginning to end.

Better performance—and 3D—with Avid hardware Better performance—and 3D—with Avid hardware

For the fastest capture/edit/monitor/output workflows, pair Media Composer with a Nitris DX or Mojo DX video interface and experience hardware-accelerated power that’s second to none. You can now even customize Nitris DX with up to two Avid DNxHD or AVC-Intra chips to fully support stereoscopic 3D and HD RGB 4:4:4 workflows.

Sleek new look and Avid Marketplace Sleek new look and Avid Marketplace

Modern, smart, and sexy. Media Composer has a whole new look, but its familiar editing workflow stays the same (watch the video). Work faster through the tabbed interface (no more window clutter!). Customize window configurations with Workspaces. Browse the Avid Marketplace for stock footage, video and audio plug-ins, software and hardware options, training materials, and more—right from within the app. You can even access user guides and other documentation without having to scour our website.

Work with 3D Work with 3D

Edit stereoscopic 3D material as quickly and easily as you do with standard 2D footage, with a full set of new features and workflows. Capture, edit, and manage the complete 3D end-to-end workflow. Mix and match 2D and stereoscopic 3D clips on the same track. Plus, work with full frame and frame-compatible sources, full-fledged editing tools, video effects, and more.

Go hands-on with Artist Color Go hands-on with Artist Color

Accelerate your color correcting and grading with Artist Color (watch the video). With its highly responsive feel, you can keep your eyes on the picture instead of the interface while you make adjustments. And since you can tweak multiple parameters at once, you dramatically gain more speed and efficiency to complete time-consuming tasks quickly.

Mix in surround sound Mix in surround sound

You want your audio to sound as spectacular as your video looks. Now you can record, edit, and mix studio-quality audio in up to 7.1 surround—right in Media Composer. Not only that, you can share mixes with Pro Tools editors (using AAF), and even record and monitor audio using a host of Avid audio interfaces. (watch the video)

WHATS NEW

  • Get better performance and speed to handle complex editing, now that Media Composer is a 64-bit app (Still need 32-bit? Learn more about Media Composer 5.5)
  • Work with the Avid or third-party hardware you want—with Avid Open I/O, third-party manufacturers can now make their I/O hardware work with Media Composer
  • Manage and edit stereoscopic 3D projects with a comprehensive set of editorial tools and workflows
  • Take hands-on control of all color correction and grading functions with Artist Color (watch the video)
  • Create 5.1 and 7.1 surround mixes directly within Media Composer, or import from Pro Tools
  • Work more creatively with audio with new mixer features and support for additional Pro Tools hardware
  • Work more easily and efficiently—but not differently—with the sleek and sexy new user interface (watch the video)
  • Get full native ProRes support on Mac (encode and decode) and Windows (decode only) for easy integration into any ProRes workflow
  • Instantly access, screen, and edit AVCHD clips and RED EPIC footage through AMA
  • Accelerate your RGB 4:4:4 workflow with Avid DNxHD 444, which delivers exceptional image quality in a low bandwidth format
  • Conveniently purchase stock footage, plug-ins, and more through the Avid Marketplace
  • Get direct access to user guides and documentation from within the interface
  • Access additional ancillary data when working with XDCAM HD material
  • Work more easily with animated effects with many keyframe editor improvements
  • Get Avid FX (Boris RED), Avid DVD, and Sorenson Squeeze in all versions of the software
  • Manage multiple licenses more easily with unified licensing

http://www.avid.com/us/products/media-composer?intcmp=AV-HP-S2

If a Chimp can Edit the News, then Let’s Buy more Bananas!

Video killed the radio star, now technology is killing editing and videographer jobs, at least at CNN.

by Nellie Andreeva Deadline.com

The cable news network today laid off 50 people in the Atlanta, New York, Washington D.C., Los Angeles and Miami offices. The bulk of the cuts are among editors, photojournalists and librarians, and CNN SVP Jack Womack explained them with the ability for virtually anyone to edit and publish video on their computers or search for background information online and with the influx of viewer-generated video. “Technology investments in our newsrooms now allow more desk-top editing and publishing for broadcast and online,” he wrote in an internal email. “This evolution allows more people in more places to edit and publish than ever before. As a result of these technology and workflow changes, CNN is reducing the number of media editors in our work force in Atlanta… We looked at the impact of user-generated content and social media, CNN iReporters and of course our affiliate contributions in breaking news. Consumer and pro-sumer technologies are simpler and more accessible. Small cameras are now high broadcast quality. More of this technology is inthe hands of more people. After completing this analysis, CNN determined that some photojournalists will be departing the company.”

Will Scorsese’s Hugo be the first 3D movie to win Best Picture Nod?

LOS ANGELES (TheWrap.com) – This was supposed to be a weekend when ground zero for Southern California movie lovers was Hollywood, site of the AFI Fest.


But Martin Scorsese exerts a gravitational pull all his own. So on Saturday afternoon, the action shifted to downtown Los Angeles for a couple of hours, where the Regal multiplex drew nearly 1,000 fans and industryites eager for a look at Scorsese’s 3D adventure “Hugo,” which had previously screened only in a work-in-progress version at the New York Film Festival.

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Throw in a post-screening Q&A with Scorsese, editor Thelma Schoonmaker, production designer Dante Ferretti, cinematographer Robert Richardson, composer Howard Shore and visual effects supervisor Robert Legato, moderated by director Paul Thomas Anderson, and you had a three-hour slice of movie nirvana (plus 39 Oscar nominations and a dozen wins on one stage).

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And in a way, movie nirvana is what “Hugo” aims to be. An adaptation of “The Invention of Hugo Cabret,” a children’s book by Brian Selznick, in Scorsese’s hands it is less a children’s story than a knowing and glorious tribute to early cinema from a master moviemaker who also happens to be a master movie-lover.

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The film will be an odd duck to market: It’s partly an adventure tale about a kid who lives in a huge Paris train station, and partly a (fictionalized) story about the silent film pioneer Georges Melies (played by a marvelous Ben Kingsley).

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Not a kids’ movie, not an art film, not a typical Scorsese effort and not necessarily an Academy movie (more on that in a minute), “Hugo” is instead a big shiny ball of imagination, invention and cinematic wonder.

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And a few hours after the downtown screening, a big room full of folks who presumably love the movies gave “Hugo” their own stamp of approval. The film had its official Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences screening on Saturday night — and according to a couple of members in attendance, the response was extremely positive, with sustained applause and a strong buzz in the room afterward.

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(Attendance, though, was not as high as it had been for some other recent Academy screenings, including “The Help” and “Moneyball.”)

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Back at the downtown screening earlier in the day, Scorsese was introduced by Anderson as “the heavyweight champ.” The director used some of the 40-minute Q&A to detail the intricacies of filming in 3D, which he said was “arduous but most of the time a good deal of fun.”

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Shooting in 3D slowed down his usual workflow, Scorsese said, though he and Schoonmaker ended up editing the film switching between 3D and 2D monitors,. He dismissed worries about the move toward 3D, and said that the technology is “just another element to tell a story.” And, he added, it’ll likely be followed by more and newer elements.

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“We’re all headed, if everything moves along and there’s no major catastrophes, we’re basically headed toward holograms,” Scorsese said. “Why can’t you have (a) 3D (movie where) Hamlet comes out into the middle of the audience and does ‘to be or not to be?’ They do in the theater. Why can’t you have it in a movie theater, or at home?”

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In the meantime, he said, he’s simply using the tools that are now available to deliver what moviegoers always wanted to see. ”The first time images started to move, immediately people wanted color, sound, big screen and depth,” he said. “And that’s just what we’re doing now.”

Star Wars Phantom Menace 3D Trailer

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