Archive for August, 2011

Sony again delivers with 3D Head-Mounted display

Technology giant Sony has unveiled a head-mounted display that takes the wearer into a 3D cinema of videos, music and games.
Future vision? The HMZ personal 3D viewer is being targetted at people who prefer solitary entertainment rather than sitting in front of a television with family or friends

Resembling a futuristic visor, the £480 ($800) device is worn like a pair of chunky goggles and earphones in one.

Officially unveiled in Tokyo today, the HMZ – which stands for head-mounted display – is equipped with two 0.7in high definition organic light emitting diode (OLED) panels and 5.1 channel dynamic audio headphone

Nintendo’s Virtual Boy, a 3-D wearable gaming machine that went on sale in the 1990s, bombed, partly because of the bulky headgear required as well as the image being all red.

Sony’s latest product is far more sophisticated, delivering an experience that is as immersive as sitting in one of the best seats in a cinema.

It is not recommended for people 15 years old and younger because some experts believe overly stimulating imagery is not good for teenagers whose brains are still developing, according to Shigeru Kato, a Sony vice president.

On the plus side, consumers are growing more accustomed to 3D these days, with the arrival of 3D TVs and game machines.

The HMZ uses Sony’s own OLED screen, a relatively new kind of display that relays superb image quality and colour, compared to the more prevalent liquid crystal and plasma displays used in laptops and flat-panel TVs.

Mr Kato said the major challenge had been making a very small display without compromising image quality.

The HMZ is set to go on sale in Japan on November 11; a U.S. and European release could come as early as Christmas.

The HMZ – which stands for head-mounted display – displays footage that is crystal clear.

It is equipped with two 0.7in high definition organic light emitting diode (OLED) panels and 5.1 channel dynamic audio headphone.

The gadget enables the wearer to experience cinema-like viewing, equivalent to watching a 750-inch screen from 20 metres away,

The music video on display at a Sony showcase for reporters in Tokyo was of a Japanese singer and was so clear that it felt like peering into a dolls house in which a real-life tiny singer is moving.

It seems unlikely that most people – or even technology enthusiasts – will want to buy a product that involves sitting alone and wearing a little helmet.

For this reason, the HMZ might not be Sony’s long-awaited answer to Apple’s iPod or iPad, but just another quirky device packed with cutting-edge technology that is headed for a limited niche following.

Nintendo’s Virtual Boy, a 3-D wearable gaming machine that went on sale in the 1990s, bombed, partly because of the bulky headgear required as well as the image being all red.

Sony’s latest product is far more sophisticated, delivering an experience that is as immersive as sitting in one of the best seats in a cinema.

It is not recommended for people 15 years old and younger because some experts believe overly stimulating imagery is not good for teenagers whose brains are still developing, according to Shigeru Kato, a Sony vice president.

On the plus side, consumers are growing more accustomed to 3D these days, with the arrival of 3D TVs and game machines.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2032130/HMZ-T1-Sony-unveils-worlds-3D-head-mounted-display-immersive-sitting-cinema.html#ixzz1WflkevM6

Tennis Anyone? U.S. Open gets a boost with 3D courtesy of Panasonic and CBS

Panasonic just announced plans to work with CBS Sports and the United States Tennis Association (USTA) for a 3D broadcast of the 2011 US Open Tennis Championships.

This will be the second consecutive year that the three will work together on the event. Last year’s 3D production snagged a 2010 Emmy Award for technical achievement. However, this year, the coverage will go beyond the Arthur Ashe Stadium to include matches from Louis Armstrong Stadium as well.

Panasonic will produce 3D versions of all of the Arthur Ashe Stadium matches that are broadcast in HD on Labor Day Weekend, as well as on Finals Weekend, which runs September 9-11, 2011. The company is also planning a bit of expanded 3D coverage, which will include new, 3D-specific positions that are covered by ten 3D broadcast cameras and a high-speed 3D replay system.

The 3D broadcasts will use a separate production team and equipment from the traditional HD broadcasts of the tournament. During the event, Panasonic will use a pre-production model of the upcoming 3DP1 handheld Full HD 3D professional camcorder to capture match and grounds coverage. The 3DP1 is expected to launch later this fall. For overall court coverage, they will incorporate the same 3D broadcast camera shadow rigs designed by the Cameron Pace Group that were used last year.

“Working with our partners CBS Sports and Panasonic, we once again expect to be a leader in presenting our sport to fans in breathtaking new ways,” said Harlan Stone, the USTA’s chief business and communications officer. “Last year we saw the impressive production values for 3D television and now, by including Louis Armstrong Stadium and expanding our distribution, we are bringing this innovative new look to the sport to more people than ever before.”

If you’re planning to be part of the action, make sure to stop by the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. Panasonic will offer 3D public viewing galleries, using the latest large-screen VIERA Full HD 3D TVs. Besides coverage of the event, visitors will also get to see some of the latest Blu-ray players and Panasonic’s VIERA Connect technology in action, with Skype, Facebook and Twitter demos. The Panasonic “Experience Amazing” 3D exhibits can be found on the ground level of Louis Armstrong Stadium, at the Panasonic 3D Gaming Center within the SmashZone, and at the Panasonic VIERA Connect booth in the South Plaza in front of Court 10.

Besides on-site event coverage, Panasonic plans to engage attendees using the FourSquare program for a scavenger hunt. Prizes, such as a Panasonic Full HD 3D Home Entertainment system, will be awarded. The full details on this promotion will be announced at a later date.

If you can’t make it out, you can catch CBS Sports’ 3D telecast of the 2011 US Open on DIRECTV’s n/3D Powered by Panasonic network, which can be found on channel 103. Comcast will also offer the broadcast coverage to Xfinity 3D subscribers. There could be additional providers announced soon, with Best Buy and other retail outlets also showing some of the 3D coverage in stores. Otherwise, you can find 3D action streaming live on the USOpen.org website.

Panasonic will use a pre-production model of the 3DP1 handheld Full HD 3D professional camcorder to capture some of the 2011 US Open.

3ality swallows the competition with purchase of Element Technica

Marking a major shift in the 3D production technology arena, Burbank-headquartered 3D technology developer 3Ality Digital has acquired Los Angeles-based Element Technica, which is best known for it 3D camera rigs.

The deal, a combination of cash and equity, is valued at “several million,” according to 3ality CEO Steve Schklair.


Once competitors in this young market, the combined businesses will now operate as a powerhouse under the moniker 3Ality Technica. 3Ality has provided 3D production gear for such upcoming features as The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, The Great Gatsby, Jack and the Giant Killer, and The Amazing-Spider Man; and Element Technica’s rigs were tapped for movies such as Prometheus and Oz: The Great and Powerful. The companies have also made inroads in 3D broadcasting; 3Ality has been working closely with Sky3D in the UK, while Element Technica rigs were used for such events as the 2010 FIFA World Cup and 2011 Wimbledon tournament.

in the 3D arena, 3Ality Technica’s most notable competitor is Cameron Pace Group, the 3D production technology developer and supplier founded by James Cameron and Vince Pace. CPG’s Fusion 3D rigs have been used on movies including Avatar, Transformers: Dark of the Moon, and Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End. In broadcasting, its technology has been tapped for projects including the NBA Finals, The Masters golf tournament, and it will be again used on this year’s 3D coverage of the US Open tennis championship.

Earlier this year, Clearlake Capital Group made a majority investment in 3Ality. At that time, 3ality’s Schklair told The Hollywood Reporter that the investment would allow the company to grow its research & development, expand service, and cover planned acquisitions.

With the acquisition, Element Technica’s two partners, Hector Ortega and Stephen Pizzo, become senior vps of 3Ality Technica.

The Element Technica staff will relocate to 3Ality’s Burbank headquarters, which recently took on additional space.

Plans are to continue to offer both 3Ality and Element Technica 3D rigs and their additional gear. With the acquisition, the company gains in house manufacturing and design capabilities, and expanded R&D.

Element Technica rigs have already been integrated with 3Ality’s popular Stereo Image Processor (SIP).

source: hollywoodreporter.com

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